Home Nutrition Nutrition Principles for Increasing Muscle Size and Strength – Part 2

Nutrition Principles for Increasing Muscle Size and Strength – Part 2

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Nutritional timings and strategies:

Protein:

Sources: Whey Protein (hydrolyse, isolate and concentrate) / eggs white protein:

Crack of dawn: First thing in the morning is to feed the muscles with aminos after being in starvation mode throughout the night.

Pre-workout: It is important to provide our muscles with a readily available fuel source pre-workout. This means the body has both glycogen and protein as its primary source. Once these have been broken down over long training periods our body with actually start to breakdown muscle tissue as its next best fuel source.

Post-workout: Quickly promote muscle repair in the 1 hour (post-workout) anabolic window period for recovery and growth.

Simple carbohydrates:

Sources: Simple carbohydrates which are fast absorbing and hit our blood stream quicker causing an insulin spike include white bread, white potatoes, sugars, candy and some types of fruit.

Crack of dawn: First thing in the morning after being in starvation mode throughout the night. During the night the liver is depleted of its glycogen storage so in turns to muscle tissue as its next best fuel source. Combine a fast carb and a whey protein upon waking to encourage protein synthesis and stop muscle breakdown.

Post-workout: During training your body using glycogen as fuel while you train. The aim is to restore glycogen levels within the 1 hour (post-workout) anabolic window period as soon as possible with fast digesting carbs. When you spike your insulin at this time your body will no store it as fat as your muscles are depleted and it will enhance muscle recovery and growth.

Complex carbohydrates and fats:

Complex carbohydrates:

Sources: Complex forms of carbohydrates include whole grains, oatmeal, whole wheat bread, whole wheat bread, whole wheat pasta and sweet potatoes.

Complex carbohydrates should be consumed 3-4 hours before HIT periods to provide a sustained fuel source throughout the game or session. They should also be consumed throughout the day in small portions to increase the body’s metabolic rate and to form a balanced diet.

Fats:

Sources: Good omega 3 fats include salmon, tuna, sardines and anchovies. Monounsaturated fats which is another form of good fats include nuts, olive oil and avocados.

Good fats should be incorporated into a balanced diet to achieve the desired health benefits. If saturated fats are consumed it should be from a whole food source such as beef, pork and chicken thighs not fried food or fast food for example. Fats should not be consumed pre or post workout as it takes the body a long time to break down this macro-nutrient as fuel. It is important not to delay the more important fuel sources being transported to the muscles to aid with recovery and growth.

Refer to the Australian dietary guidelines for the food sources to consume to implement this strategy.



Source by Daniel Basray

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